Wildlife in Trade Programme

 

VIDEOS

  • Cameroon: hunting down the ivory traffickers - view

ARTICLES

  • Pesticide poisonings at a tertiary children’s hospital in South Africa: an increasing problem
    KATE H. BALME1, J. CLARE ROBERTS1, MARION GLASSTONE1, LINDA CURLING1, HANNA-ANDREA ROTHER2,
    LESLIE LONDON2, HEATHER ZAR3, and MICHAEL D. MANN3 - click
  • Falling Through the Regulatory Cracks: Street Selling of Pesticides and Poisoning among Urban Youth in South Africa - READ MORE
  • Improving poisoning diagnosis and surveillance of street pesticides - Hanna-Andrea Rother - READ MORE
  • Poverty, Pests and Pesticides Sold on South Africa's Streets - Hanna-Andrea Rother - READ MORE
  • Minister Edna Molewa briefs Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs on steps taken to address Illegal Wildlife Trade....READ MORE
  • ZSL & IUCN Pangolin Red List Press Release....READ MORE
  • The Middelburg Cycad, Encephalartos middelburgensis, is listed as ‘Critically Endangered’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM....READ MORE
  • Jackals poisoned in Addo Elephant Park ...READ MORE
  • Welcome to the age of Cycad trafficking...READ MORE
  • Pangolin poachers caught in Zim...READ MORE
  • Uganda seizes massive ivory, pangolin haul...READ MORE
  • Protecting the pangolin a priority....READ MORE

OTHER

Prince William condemns wildlife trafficking

In his first visit to Washington, Britain's Prince William on Monday sharply denounced the rapid growth of illegal wildlife trading worldwide and announced a task force to examine the transportation industry's role in facilitating such crimes.
The Duke of Cambridge described wildlife trafficking as "one of the most insidious forms of corruption and criminality" where networks of gangs profit from the illegal killing or capture of animals.
"Together, they loot our planet to feed mankind's ignorant craving for exotic pets, trinkets, cures and ornaments derived from the world's vanishing and irreplaceable species," William said at an anti-corruption conference at the World Bank.
Citing statistics from Interpol, the international police organisation, William said recent seizures of illegal wildlife products were the largest the agency has seen. In 2011, the 17 biggest seizures by customs agents resulted in 27 000 kilograms of ivory, equivalent to the tusks of some 3 000 elephants.
William said his interest in the issue stems from his father's and grandfather's longtime passion for wildlife conservation. The prince is president of "United for Wildlife," a coalition of seven global conservation groups that will organise the new task force.
The task force, which will include representatives from the transportation industry, will gather data on illegal wildlife trade routes and commission research. It will also call on companies to adopt a "zero-tolerance" policy on such trading and develop industry recommendations within a year. Former British foreign secretary William Hague will lead the task force.
"Our collective goal must be to reduce the wildlife trade by making it harder: denying traffickers access to transportation, putting up barriers to their illegal activities and holding people accountable for their actions," William said.

For more information check the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GiHM5e9Vb9Q#t=29

 

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