Wildlife in Trade Programme


We work to reduce the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products through various initiatives including capacity building among law enforcement agencies and the judiciary, cooperation and strategy development with other conservation NGOs, commenting on proposed legislation, and support for various rhino conservation initiatives.

Record-breaking 40-year sentence for rhino crimes
Our support and advice to Magistrate Prince Manyathi and Advocate Marilè van Heerden played an important role in the sentencing of Mr. Chumlong Lemtongtai in November 2013. A Thai citizen, Mr. Lemtongtai was sentenced to 40 years imprisonment for rhino related crimes. We provided information on the increasing rates of rhino poaching, the increasing involvement of Thai citizens in the illegal trading in rhino horns and the devastating effect on our rhino populations....See Rhino Project page

Tackling the illegal trade in pangolins
Support to Advocate Isabet Erwee (Nelspruit Regional Court) regarding information on the status and relevant legislation on Ground Pangolin, resulted in a successful prosecution of an accused who illegally hunted a pangolin in the KNP. He received the following sentence: twelve months imprisonment or R5000 and an additional four years imprisonment suspended for five years. This was the first pangolin court case in Mpumalanga and will hopefully not be the last in the fight to save this species....www.pangolin.org.za

Arming role-players with information:
The EWT Rhino Security Booklet was updated and 2,000 copies were distributed to rhino owners, managers and enforcement officials. This is a resource aimed at rhino owners and managers to assist them with rhino protection. It provides advice and guidance on security issues and what to do and who to contact when poaching incidents occur.

Support for the Black Mambas at Balule Private Nature Reserve:
The Black Mambas, an all women Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) deployed in the 50,000 hectare Balule Private Nature Reserve, embody the “Bobby on the Beat” philosophy and are responsible for early detection, crime prevention and support for the armed APU. Starting in May 2013, this innovative programme has been so successful that other land owners and wardens have requested their own units, and numbers have grown from six to 26 women in just over a year. We have supported this unit through the provision of uniforms and equipment.

Assessing the benefits of wildlife ranching in South Africa
After more than two years of planning, we received funding from the Green Fund via the Development Bank of South Africa for our Wildlife Ranching Project. This important and long-overdue study will run over a period of 15 months, starting in April 2014, and will assess the contribution that private wildlife ranching makes to the green economy of South Africa. Wildlife ranching is a large and growing industry that has great potential to expand the economy, create jobs and conserve biodiversity, although there are also potential negative issues that need to be addressed. There is a lack of knowledge on the scale of the industry at a national level, which prevents the government from understanding the benefits of using land for such purposes and hinders the ability of law makers to guide policy effectively.

Supporting provincial agencies
We continue to support the provincial conservation agencies that lack resources and capacity to effectively protect their rhino by providing fuel and field equipment.

Shaping policy and legislation
We provided extensive comments on 11 draft and amended legislation documents, including: provincial procedures, policies and norms and standards; national species strategies and action plans; species-specific Non-Detriment Findings; national regulations and Acts. Up to as many as 90% of our comments were accepted and incorporated, indicating that we have a valuable role to play in shaping South Africa’s suite of environmental legislation.

Project Hayi Laa!
We work to reduce the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products through various initiatives including capacity building among law enforcement agencies and the judiciary, working with communities impacted by wildlife crime, cooperation and strategy development with other conservation NGOs, commenting on proposed legislation, and support for various rhino conservation initiatives.


Contact Details:

Adam Pires: Programme Manager email

Ashleigh Dore: Training Coordinator email

Dr. Andrew Taylor: Wildlife Trade and Ranching Project email

Michael Adams email

Dr. Kelly Marnewick email

Claire Patterson-Abrolat: Special Projects email

Ndzalama Chauke: Administrator

Ndifelani Mulaudzi: Intern