Issue 55: October - Nov 2014
  • Spring babies, a first for the Riverine Rabbit Project
  • Sungazer Working Group Meeting and Non-detriment Finding Workshop
  • Marking White-backed Vultures at Mokala National Park
  • Exploring Conservation and Community Welfare along the Wild Coast
  • Operational Minimisation of Wind Turbines to reduce the impact on Bats at Wind Energy Facilities
  • The Wildlife and Roads Project in Sweden
  • The Wildlife and Roads Project is back in Pilanesberg
  • Post support for land claimants on biodiversity conservation
  • Mapping Threats to Grey Crowned Cranes
  • Are you a responsible tourist?
  • Going Wild at the Williston Winter Festival
  • Jackal Buzzards use artificial nest for breeding
  • De Aar Power Line Survey

 

EWT Patrons
SUPPORTERS US

Framework Donor
R100 000 and above per annum

Senior Corporate Member
R70 000 - R100 000 per annum

Corporate Member
R25 000 - R70 000 per annum

Corporate Supporter
R5 000 - R25 000 per annum

Contact us for futher information
Carla van Rooyen
Business Development Officer
carlav@ewt.org.za

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A WORD FROM OUR CEO

The right solutions, the right partners

The EWT recently published our comprehensive integrated report for the period 2013/2014 which can be viewed online here: http://www.ewt.org.za/conreports/2014/book.swf. We are proud of this report – not only because the design, layout and content is striking and highly engaging! But importantly, because the report demonstrates that the EWT is delivering on our mandate and is achieving Conservation in Action across the region. The Trust has worked hard in recent years to ensure that our Conservation Strategy is directed towards delivering tangible, measurable results and we have established clear targets that allow us to measure both our progress as well as understand our failings, in order for us to adapt and re-think our tactics. During the reporting period, the EWT was able to deliver excellent results (on track towards achieving targets and goals) on 61% of our 84 Programme targets; we were only lagging behind – or had not started – on 6% of our targets. The challenges we face are not unlike those faced by almost everyone else these days: funding constraints, capacity limitations and an overwhelming workload. Where we have been successful, it is not due to the targets being too easy - and achieving a marked reduction in powerline collisions for various bird species, or stabilising and in some cases increasing the population size of species such as Wattled Cranes for example, occurs as a result of years of dedicated, committed hard work to develop sound partnerships with landowners, communities and industry to implement effective conservation practices. Among the steady stream of bad news that bombards us daily, and the deteriorating situation facing species such as rhino and elephants, there remains a glimmer of hope when we see what can be done when the right solutions are found. Where we have struggled, we continue to reflect on how to adapt our work and we take to heart the principles that underpin the integrated reporting concept, so that we guide and shape our future operations and actions as part of this dynamic process. I welcome your feedback and input on this report which is really for you, our supporters and partners in this conservation journey.

On the subject of partners, the EWT wishes hearty congratulations to the newly appointed CEO of SANParks, Fundisile Mketeni, who has spent the last 10 years as the Deputy Director General responsible for Biodiversity and Conservation in the Department of Environmental Affairs. The EWT currently runs a number of projects in the Kruger National Park and looks forward to supporting SANParks even more as they grapple with some of the toughest challenges facing conservation in recent times. The advent of wildlife contraband into the dark and murky world of transnational organised crime has changed the game for every conservation agency and NGO in this region, and none of us cannot face up to the reality that our precious wildlife heritage is being trafficked, traded and decimated at unprecedented rates. This is not a fight that South Africa can win alone and never before were partners, locally, regionally and globally more important. It is in this vein that the EWT has engaged a wide variety of ‘non-traditional’ partners in recent times including traditional healers, church leaders, members of the SAPS and SARS / Customs agencies, magistrates, border control officers, social scientists, population experts, prosecutors and politicians – as our key partners in fighting wildlife crime going forward. It is not just these people that are learning about ‘our wildlife problems’ but we are learning about ‘their social / human problems’. This cohesive approach that integrates all role-players into a unified force for social and environmental benefit, will provide the right solutions and the right partners for future success where the results will affect us all.

We wish you all peace and happiness over the upcoming holiday season and thank you for your ongoing support.

Yolan Friedmann
CEO EWT

PROJECT NEWS

Spring babies, a first for the Riverine Rabbit Project
By Bonnie Schumann, the EWT's Drylands Conservation Programme, Senior Field Officer

The first ever camera trap photos of juvenile Riverine Rabbits in the Nama Karoo were recently captured during restoration baseline assessments carried out by the Riverine Rabbit Project staff near Loxton. These surveys were conducted as part of ongoing research into the distribution and density of Riverine Rabbits in the Nama Karoo using camera traps. Several photos of this rare finding – young Critically Endangered Riverine Rabbits - were captured by two cameras, one in a study area along the Sak River near Loxton, and the other along the Maanhaarspruit River near Victoria West. It was great to see these baby bunnies out and about following the particularly severe winter experienced in this region....READ MORE

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Sungazer Working Group Meeting and Non-detriment Finding Workshop
Bradley Gibbons, the EWT’s Threatened Grassland Conservation Programme, Field Officer

The EWT’s Threatened Grassland Species Programme's Sungazer Working Group (SWG) recently met over two days at Sterkfontein Dam, near Harrismith in the Free State in the month of October. The main meeting took place on the first day followed by a field trip in the afternoon to an area where Sungazers had been recently sighted nearby the dam.....READ MORE


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Marking White-backed Vultures at Mokala NP
By Ronelle Visagie, EWT’s Birds of Prey Programme Field Officer

During October I had the opportunity to work with Beryl Wilson of the McGregor Museum in Kimberley, to mark the White-backed Vulture chicks at Mokala NP with the help of our Hawk Conservancy colleagues from England and two experienced tree climbers that came from France. There is one breeding colony in the area that is spread out over Mokala NP and the neighbouring farms, Wildehondepan and Schutsekama......READ MORE

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Exploring Conservation and Community Welfare along the Wild Coast
By Bridget Corrigan, the EWT's Source to Sea Programme Manager

The Wild Coast in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa stretches 250km from the Kei River in the south, to the Mtamvuna River in the north. The Wild Coast conjures images of the rugged coastline, interspersed with narrow gorges and waterfalls, and historically undeveloped nature of the region....READ MORE


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Operational Minimisation of Wind Turbines to reduce the impact on Bats at Wind Energy Facilities
By Lourens Leeuwner ,the EWT’s Wildlife and Energy Programme, Renewable Energy Project Manager

Bats are susceptible to colliding with wind turbines, although the conditions under which these collisions occur have not always been well understood. Consistent patterns of bat fatalities have emerged across a number of studies investigating bat interactions with wind turbines in the United States and Europe. Many of these findings tie up with the behavioural information already available on bats and conservation bodies and NGOs are now trying to encourage wind energy developers to apply what they term `Operational Minimisation` to turbines where high bat fatalities have been recorded. Turbine will require less maintenance if it is allowed to turn at low wind conditions, even if the generator is not engaged.....READ MORE


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The Wildlife and Roads Project in Sweden
By Wendy Collinson, the EWT’s Wildlife and Roads Project, Project Executant

I was privileged to attend an International Conference on Road Ecology in Sweden, in September 2014. There were many experts from around the world and it was an opportunity to meet them, and learn about many of their solutions to reduce roadkill on roads......READ MORE

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The Wildlife and Roads Project is back in Pilanesberg
By Wendy Collinson, the EWT’s Wildlife and Roads Project, Project Executant

Look out for the EWT's Wildlife and Roads Project in Pilanesberg National Park during November. We will be collecting roadkill data for the next month, to identify potential roadkill hotspots. If, during your travels, you spot any roadkill on our roads please record your sighting via and the WTP will use the data you share in their work to reduce the impacts of transport on our wildlife. The WTP has launched the Road Watch South Africa smartphone app to make your participation in their Roadkill Research and Mitigation Project easier.

To take part simply type this link into the Safari browser on your Android platform phone:
http://www.prismsw.com/roadwatch/android/RoadWatchSouthAfrica.apk. The app is finally available on iPhone. Simply visit the South African iTunes store and search for “Road Watch” and download to your iPhone.

You can also send your sightings to us at roads@ewt.org.za. We need the location (preferably GPS co-ordinates), species seen and date. We challenge you to record as much roadkill data as possible and send it to us.

The EWT’s Wildlife and Roads Project is supported by Bridgestone SA and Arrow Bulk Logistics, with logistical support from Mopane Bush Lodge and Copenhagen Zoo. For further information please contact Wendy Collinson on wendyc@ewt.org.za

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Post support for land claimants on biodiversity conservation, fire and grazing management. A long overdue approach, which has potential for duplication in other needy areas
By Samson Phakathi, the EWT’s Threatened Grassland Species Programme, Field Officer

With the land-reform process increasingly re-allocating rural properties to indigenous people in KwaZulu-Natal; it has become pertinent that communities be empowered on biodiversity conservation if one is to ensure the long term sustainability of ecosystems and species conservation. The vast majority of the land claimants in KwaZulu-Natal have had no land management training resulting in extensive over grazing in most communal lands....READ MORE

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Mapping Threats to Grey Crowned Cranes in Eastern Uganda: Results of a Rapid Survey for Conservation Action
By William Olupot Nature and Livelihoods

This article summarises results and recommendations of a survey of Grey Crowned Cranes conducted in Eastern Uganda and the threats they face, the report on which was completed in August 2014. The study was one of the highest resolution assessments of the distribution of Grey Crowned Cranes conducted in eastern Uganda to-date, and was the first systematic attempt to document roosting sites of African Cranes.....READ MORE

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Are you a responsible tourist?
By Rynette Coetzee, the EWT’s Law Enforcement Programme, Project Executant

Responsible tourism has become one of the latest catch phrases being bandied around. But what does it mean and to whom does it refer? In the world in which the Endangered Wildlife Trust operates, it refers to responsible wildlife related tourism activities. Basically anything that has to do with or impacts on wildlife. READ MORE

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Going Wild at the Williston Winter Festival
By Bonnie Schumann, the EWT's Drylands Conservation Programme, Senior Field Officer

What have the Silver Creek Mountain Band, Koos Kombuis and Riverine Rabbits got in common? Why - the Williston Winter Festival of course! For the fifth year running Williston played host to the Karoo’s best winter festival in September this year. Local musicians flocked to Williston in the Nama Karoo and were followed by locals from around South Africa. This year the EWT’s Drylands Conservation Programme joined the migration to Williston at the insistence of Pieter Naude....READ MORE


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Jackal Buzzards use artificial nest for breeding
By Ronnel Visagie, the EWT’s Birds of Prey Programme Field Officer

During a nest monitoring visit in October 2010 a Jackal Buzzard chick was discovered on the ground under a windmill in the Kalkbult farm in the De Aar district. The nest was on the platform of the windmill, but was blown off by the wind. This prompted farmer, Kurt Krog of the farm Kalkbult, to go back home to prepare an old tyre as an artificial nest....READ MORE


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De Aar Power Line Survey
By Constant Hoogstad ,the EWT’s Wildlife and Energy Programme Manager

The Karoo is known for its simplistic beauty and vast open landscapes. It may seem rather barren at first, but when you look closely you will start to see life all over place. Besides the massive flocks of delicious roaming sheep looking for the least dry plants to nibble on, one will notice other critters scouring about, however well they are camouflaged. The Endangered Wildlife Trust – Wildlife and Energy Programme made its routine visit to Karoo town of De Aar. The purpose of these visits is to assess the impacts that large transmission power lines have on the local bird population. This is what we found....READ MORE

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We Challenge You to Ride for Wildlife!

Earlier this month, three motorcyclists, Nick Yell, Jaco Loots and Dirk Ackerman set off on a 2043 km circular journey — predominantly on minor dirt tracks — to highlight the plight of African wildlife affected by the impacts of roads and transport in the Karoo. The bikers were on a mission to collect roadkill data for the EWT’s Wildlife and Roads Project.
The bikers started their epic ride on 2 November in the town of Aberdeen in the Great Karoo and passed through a number of towns and concluded their journey in Willowmore on 9 November. They recorded a total of 47 roadkill with Aardwolf (11) and Steenbok (7) being the most common species detected.

The EWT has been actively collecting roadkill data on South African roads for the last year through its Wildlife and Roads Project. A national campaign was also launched to encourage members of the public to assist with roadkill data collection through the reporting of their sightings.


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Submit Roadkill Data and Stand a Chance to Win!

Submit roadkill data and photographs. Specify the location of the roadkill (preferably GPS co-ordinates), identify the species seen and record the date on which it was seen. Recorded roadkill sightings and photographs can be sent to roads@ewt.org.za and via the EWT’s Road Watch South Africa smartphone app which can be downloaded on http://www.prismsw.com/roadwatch/android/RoadWatchSouthAfrica.apk. Seven members of the public who accurately record and submit the most roadkill sightings between 1 November 2014 and 31 January 2015 will stand a chance to win prizes.

Prizes up for grabs include:

  • 1st prize: 1 x Zeus 2100B helmet; 1 X set halogen spotlights; 1 x set off-road tyres; 1 x Desert Fox fuel cell and a year's membership to the EWT – Approximate value R5,000
  • 2nd Prize: 1 x Zeus 2100B helmet and 1 X set halogen spotlights and a year's membership to the EWT – Approximate value R2, 200
  • 3rd prize: 1x Desert Fox fuel cell, 1 x tyre repair kit; 1 x P1 lube and a year's membership to the EWT – Approximate value R1,050
  • 4 x consolation prizes : 1 x tyre repair kit and 1 x P1 lube – Approximate value R 460
    Total Value of prizes: Over R10, 000

The EWT’s Wildlife and Roads project is supported by Bridgestone SA and Arrow Bulk Logistics, with logistical support from Mopane Bush Lodge. For further information please contact Wendy Collinson on wendyc@ewt.org.za

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EVENTS

Please diarise the following events:
The costs for the events will be communicated in January 2015

Amphibians: The Importance and Plight of Frogs - Presented by Jeanne Tarrant, the EWT’s Threatened Amphibians Programme Manager
When: 3rd February 2015
Where: Country Club Johannesburg, Auckland Park, Johannesburg
Contact: Debbie Thiart on 011 372 3600/1/2/3 or debbiet@ewt.org.za for more information

Wild Dogs at the Paw front of Conservation – Presented by Kelly Marnewick, the EWT’s Carnivore Conservation Programme Manage
When: 3rd March 2015
Where: Country Club Johannesburg, Auckland Park, Johannesburg
Contact: Debbie Thiart on 011 372 3600/1/2/3 or debbiet@ewt.org.za for more information

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E-SHOP

New additions to the exclusive EWT / Relate’s gorgeous wildlife bracelet collection…

The EWT will soon be launching two gorgeous new bracelets before Christmas, namely the Pickersgills Reed Frog and the Bateleur Eagle, to add to your current collection. The EWT and Relate’s collector’s range of beautifully beaded, endangered species themed bracelets make super Xmas gifts for the whole family! Please continue to support our work by purchasing the Cheetah, Wild Dog, Rhino and Dugong bracelets from Tiger’s Eye stores like Indaba and Out Of Africa nationwide, EWT Rhino bracelet from selected CNA stores, and soon to be in selected Trapper’s Trading stores. You can also buy on line at www.ewtshop.co.za or at www.relate.org.za


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SUPPORTER NEWS

We need Your Vote to secure project funding!

The EWT has made a funding application for a “Population, Health & Environment” project which requires you to vote for us. Over 400 applicants are seeking funding from Hivos for its Social Innovation Award, only twenty will progress to the semi-finals. need you to vote for us.

We need your vote! 4 minutes of your day to watch this video and a vote for this important work will help the EWT and TVEP to change the future of Africa's human population growth and the natural world in which we all live. To read more about the project and vote, please click here. By voting and sharing the link with your network you can directly help the EWT raise funds for this programme.

https://hivossocialinnovationaward.org/projects/human-population-growth-endangered-species/

The Momentum 94.7 Cycle Challenge
The Endangered Wildlife Trust is proud to announce that we ended of with 76 cyclists riding for our cause on 16th November 2014. We would like to thank all the riders. We are now gearing up for the cycle challenge for 2015 with a striking new kit and hope to increase our team to at least 100.

Fundraise for EWT- Cape Town Cycle Tour Cape Argus 2015
The Endangered Wildlife Trust is registered as a charity bond for the Cape Argus 2015. The cycle tour is on 8th March 2015.
Please visit http://fundraising.cycletour.co.za/ and nominate the EWT for your fundraising campaign. Get involved and do your part to bring an end to extinction!

For any queries contact Debbie on debbiet@ewt.org.za or call her on 011 372 3600/1/2/3

Giving Tuesday
Will you be taking part in Giving Tuesday? Giving Tuesday is a global day dedicated to supporting the causes close to your heart, and will be taking place on 2 December. Read more about this day at givingtuesday.org. It’s not too early to get ready for #Giving Tuesday! Share what you’re doing for this international day of giving by taking an #UNselfie and uploading it to Facebook or Twitter. The EWT staff have already started planning our acts of giving. Make this festive season a time for giving and acts of kindness. Giving Tuesday: We’re in, are you?

Welcome to our most recent supporters:

  • Cavalli Stud (General Support)
  • KLB Engineering (General Support)
  • Adcorp (Skills Development)
  • Table Mountain Fund (- African Crane Conservation Programme, Drylands Conservation Programme, Threatened Grassland Species Programme)
  • Pretoria High School for Girls (Rhino Project)
  • Rand Merchant Bank (National Business and Biodiversity)
  • Welgevonden (Carnivore Conservation Programme)
  • Conservation International Foundation (African Crane Conservation Programme)
  • The Green Trust (Source to Sea Programme)
  • Bakwena Platinum Corridor (Carnivore Conservation programme)
  • Legacy Lifestyle (General Support)
  • Sean Williams Creatures Trust (Carnivore Conservation Programme)
  • National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund (General support, Skills Development, TGSP, African Crane Conservation Programme, Drylands Conservation Programme)
  • Knowsley Safari Park (Carnivore Conservation Programme)

Head Office: Endangered Wildlife Trust, Private Bag X11, Modderfontein, Gauteng, 1645 (T) +27 11 3723600 (F) +27 11 6084682, www.ewt.org.za

Update your details: contact ewtalk@ewt.org.za / Join the EWT family: sign up for an EWT membership click here.
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