How Cheetahs got their spot in the EWT’s history

How Cheetahs got their spot in the EWT’s history

Andrew Lowry studied Wildlife Management at Pretoria University and was selected to conduct Cheetah Research in Etosha National Park in 1973 – the first project of the newly founded Endangered Wildlife Trust.

Why the Cheetah?

Why the Cheetah?

The Red Cheetah Paw has boldly represented the Endangered Wildlife Trust for 50 years, and is synonymous with responsible and effective conservation in Africa. Here is an account from our founder explaining why he used the Cheetah paw as the Trust’s logo.

The historical role of women in the ewt

The historical role of women in the ewt

In 1975, I took a group of eight women on a walking trail in the Mashatu Game Reserve in northeastern Botswana. They had told their husbands they were off to the bush for five days, and their husbands had to take care of their kids while on ‘trail’. This trail ultimately led to the formation of the EWT Ladies Committee

Getting fired up for frogs

Getting fired up for frogs

Klein Swartberg Mountain is home to the only known populations of the Critically Endangered Rough Moss Frog, which faces grave threats within this range, including habitat loss caused by alien invasive plants and frequent unplanned fires, which have led to a severe population decline.

Umgavusa Protected Environment

Umgavusa Protected Environment

The infectious drive for amphibian conservation by local frog conservation pioneers has awakened a love for frogs and frogging within the community, who flocked to the newly proclaimed Umgavusa Protected Environment to catch a glimpse of the Endangered Pickersgill’s Reed Frog.