[vc_row][vc_column][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1564132218313{margin-right: 2% !important;margin-left: 2% !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/3″ css=”.vc_custom_1564134365074{padding-right: 8% !important;padding-left: 8% !important;}”][vc_column_text]

RMB SENSING JOURNEY

[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”5140″ img_size=”full” alignment=”center”][vc_column_text]Alison Janicke, EWT Head of Resource Development
AlisonJ@ewt.org.za
[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]As part of the RMB Senior Leaders Programme, leaders are provided with opportunities to step out of their usual arenas, in order to see and experience “sparks of the future” – people and places of innovation and collaboration in service of society as a whole and not just the agenda of a few – and to connect more deeply with those on the edges of the mainstream. They call these “sensing journeys”. Inevitably, such experiences open their eyes, hearts and minds to possibilities not found in the business-as-usual space, and enable a reconfiguration of purpose, relationships, and meaningful action.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”5141″ img_size=”large” add_caption=”yes” alignment=”center”][vc_column_text]A cohort of ten RMB leaders conducted their sensing journey site visit to the EWT on the morning of 20 February. The interactive onsite visit involved an opportunity to engage and participate meaningfully with EWT staff to enable them to get insight into the EWT’s work and vision. Activities included a presentation covering the work of the EWT, the support received from RMB, and the impact owning our property will have on the EWT in the future; a visit to the wetland on the EWT’s Conservation Campus,  including a discussion on how to identify alien species, the negative effects of these species, and how to remove the species, followed by an opportunity to navigate the wetland, identify an alien species and remove the species; and a variety of demonstrations of EWT work, including an EWT Conservation Canine detection demonstration.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”5142″ img_size=”large” add_caption=”yes” alignment=”center”][vc_single_image image=”5143″ img_size=”large” add_caption=”yes” alignment=”center”][vc_single_image image=”5144″ img_size=”large” add_caption=”yes” alignment=”center”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/3″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1566891493571{margin-top: 8px !important;border-bottom-width: 6px !important;}”]

LATEST STORIES

[/vc_column_text][vc_widget_sidebar sidebar_id=”cs-1″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_googleplus][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_facebook][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_tweetmeme][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Featured Story

Addressing the impacts of power lines on Grey Crowned Cranes in Lwengo

Addressing the impacts of power lines on Grey Crowned Cranes in Lwengo Gilbert Tayebwa (Southcentral Uganda field officer and Sarah Kugonza (Conservation Intern) Introduction Any bird able to fly stands a chance of colliding with above-ground power lines and being...

Sign up for our newsletter

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.